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Following a successful first event in Tucson, the Content Protection Retreat (CPR) is heading to Hollywood, where ‘CPR 2’ will take place on February 6th and 7th at the Sofitel Hotel on Beverly Blvd. As with the first CPR, the event is private, and no members of the media will be permitted to attend.


The CPR is more than just an adult industry event; it is part of a wider movement to combat online piracy and copyright infringement of adult content, using a broad variety of techniques and approaches. Contrary to what some reports have suggested, the CPR is NOT simply about filing lawsuits.



Central to the CPR strategy is participation in the Free Speech Coalition’s Anti-Piracy Action Program, and use of the broad range of services that APAP offers, including: copyright registration consultation, recommended vendor referrals, digital fingerprint maintenance and filtering, DMCA services, best practice information, attorney referrals, and general intellectual property information and consultation. The more studios that join APAP, the more difficult (and less profitable) the lives of adult content pirates will become.

The CPR also provides adult studios with a private forum in which to receive advice from experts in intellectual property law, view demonstrations of technology like digital fingerprint filtering, and share information about the challenges and opportunities that face our industry.

Content piracy cannot be eliminated, but it can be mitigated, and in the process of alleviating the impact of piracy, studios can recoup some of the revenue that has been lost to them through the misappropriation of their intellectual property. It will not be easy, but worthy efforts rarely are.


The goal of the CPR is to significantly reduce digital piracy of adult content and to effectively drive those who engage in adult content piracy completely underground by January 2012.



when and where  |  who can attend  |  agenda  |  sign up |  contact